Ternary telegraphy

A while back, we looked at ternary computing; that is, computers using three values (+1, 0, and -1) instead of two (1 and 0). This does make arithmetic a bit more complicated but also helps store more information: a bit can store one of two values, but a trit stores one of three. The trit … Continue reading Ternary telegraphy

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Does assembler math have a history? Part 4

Last week we've described how the basic entities of assembly - in this case a string - come in three layers. They don't have a history on the most abstract one, where they're just input, output, or intermediary state. They do have history on the most concrete one, though, where it matters whether a string … Continue reading Does assembler math have a history? Part 4

Does assembler math have a history? Part 3

Last time we looked at the history of algorithms to see if assembler math can have a history as far as its operations are concerned, and we decided it does. Now it's time to look at the entities being compiled - say, strings, arithmetic variables, GOTO commands and loops, command lines and parsing, and so … Continue reading Does assembler math have a history? Part 3

Does Assembler Math have a history? Part 2

Following up on two weeks ago, we've now established that the math behind assembly can have a history in two ways: either in the elements to be assembled, or in the operations when going about doing so. Today we'll take a look at the second of these two: the operations going into assembly. You'll probably … Continue reading Does Assembler Math have a history? Part 2